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Low-angle self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the site from which it reached down to drill into a rock target called 'Buckskin' on lower Mount Sharp. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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This image released by NASA on 24 February 2015 shows a self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover at the 'Mojave' site, where its drill collected the mission's second taste of Mount Sharp. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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This self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity released by NASA on 17 April 2014 shows the efects of wind events that had cleaned much of the accumulated dust of the rover's solar panels. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, on 5 August 2015. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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NASA's Curiosity rover used the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) to capture this set of 55 high-resolution images, which were stitched together to create this full-colour self-portrait. The mosaic shows the rover at 'Rocknest,' the spot in Gale Crater where the mission's first scoop sampling took place. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Guess who's now taking selfies: NASA's Curiosity rover

Priyata Brajabasi @PriyataB

We've been told robots can now do pretty much everything human beings can. Apparently that now includes an obsession with selfies.

NASA has just released a new panoramic 'selfie' sent back by the robotic planetary explorer Curiosity as it moves over the surface of the red planet.

Captured using the ultimate selfie stick - its 7-foot-long robotic arm - the scene was stitched together by combining dozens of pictures taken by a camera designed for analysing rocks.

One low-angle image shows the unmanned vehicle's belly at the Buckskin site where it drilled to collect samples of Martian soil. For this shot, NASA said, the rover team positioned the camera lower than for any previous full self-portrait of Curiosity.

This month marks the third anniversary of Curiosity's landing on Mars. During that time, it has journeyed almost 7 miles (approx 11 km), taken countless photos and discovered an ancient riverbed, which helped scientists determine that Mars' environment probably could have once supported life.

The rover is currently climbing Mars' Mount Sharp, a Mount Rainier-size mountain at the centre of the planet's vast Gale Crater. Sounds like the perfect setting for more selfies. #WhereNoManHasGoneBefore

Priyata Brajabasi

Priyata Brajabasi @PriyataB