#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

An Indian resident stands on the roof her her house in the slums near a network of cables and dish antennas in New Delhi on 3 August, 2012. There are currently 515 over-the-air and satellite television stations in India with Hindi television channels having the highest market share with their availability throughout the country. Photo: Raveendran/AFP

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

A man purchasing Television set top box from a store on October 31, 2012 in New Delhi, India. Photo by Priyanka Parashar/Mint via Getty Images

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

An Afghan burqa-clad woman vendor holds a television over her shoulder as she negotiates a sale on the street in Mazar-i-sharif on March 28, 2015. Photo: Frashad Usyan/AFP

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

Afghans refugees watch the live broadcast of the Cricket World Cup match between Afghanistan and Bangladesh at a market in Peshawar on 18 February, 2015. Born in refugee camps and nurtured in the midst of bloody civil strife, Afghanistan's cricketers have reached another landmark on their extraordinary journey after making their World Cup debut against Bangladesh. After batting first in the match Bangladesh were all out for 267 runs in their innings. Photo: A Majeed/AFP

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

Indian Border Security Force (BSF) personnel celebrate as they watch a live broadcast of the Cricket World Cup match between Indian and Pakistan at the India-Pakistan Wagah Border Post on February 15, 2015. Photo: Narinder Nanu/AFP

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

Indian sadhus - holy men - of Juna Akhara and supporters of Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) watch the election results on a television in Varanasi on 16 May,2014. India's triumphant Hindu nationalists declared "the start of a new era" in the world's biggest democracy Friday as the ruling Congress conceded defeat in elections that exposed anger about sickly economic growth and rampant corruption. Photo: Sanjay Kanojia/AFP

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

An Indian slum resident salvages a television set from his burnt shanty in Bawana on the outskirts of New Delhi on 12 April, 2013. A fire broke out in a slum on the outskirts of New Delhi, a local report said, with one person reported dead and another five injured. Photo: Manan Vatsyayana/AFP

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

Customers browse televisions at Vijay Sales in Mumbai, India on Tuesday, 7 September, 2010. Consumers in India are set to spend record amounts on gold, televisions, cars and groceries this festival season buoyed by the fastest pace of economic expansion in two and half years. Photo: Kuni Takahashi/Bloomberg

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

Commonwealth Games Delhi 2010. Photo shows a Indian family watching the Commonwealth Games in their home in a slum in New Delhi. Portrait of Rakesh Kumar, with son Ankush and mother Ramwati. Photo: Jason South/The AGE/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

Supporters of Pakistan Muslim League-N (PMLN) watch election results on a tv set on the street on 11 May, 2013 in the Old City of Lahore, Pakistan. Millions of Pakistanis cast their votes in parliamentary elections held today on 11 May. It is the first time in the country's history that an elected government will hand over power to another elected government. Photo: Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

An Indian man carries a television set through flood waters in Howrah district in West Bengal state on 7 August, 2015. Rivers have burst their banks, hitting thousands of villages in parts of West Bengal as well as northeastern Manipur state, where roads and bridges have been cut. Photo: AFP

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

i

A Chinese laborer stands amongst old televisions and computers to be recycled in the Dong Xiao Kou village on 11 December, 2014 in Beijing, China. Photo: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

#WORLDTELEVISIONDAY

#WorldTelevisionDay: Yes, YouTube is there. But can you do away with the tube?

Vikas Kumar @CatchNews

Television is an indispensable part of our lives today. You can love it or hate it but you simply cannot ignore it.

Internet has started to challenge the monopoly of television in our homes to some extent. Although some people argue that internet has only underlined its importance. You need a hi-speed internet to watch live events, which doesn't come cheap. Whereas all it takes in TV, is a power supply and cable connection.

Still, an increasing number of viewers are getting fed up with TV. This segment thinks 'idiot box' is polluting human brains with trash content.

As a result, there are attempts to break the image of TV as a medium for family entertainment. It is believed whole family can watch most of TV programs together. But, TV content is slowly evolving to a point where it will separately cater to different members of the family.

Many people predicted doom for literature when TV came. People feared newspapers, books and radio would fade into oblivion. However, all those mediums not only held their grounds, they even grew.

On the other hand, time for dissemination of information has increased phenomenally. News travel in a matter of minutes across the world in this information age.

On the occasion of World TV day, we hope television will continue to entertain with a better content. Technology will help it reach even farther corners of the world.

Vikas Kumar

Vikas Kumar @CatchNews