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Among the most popular breeds in India, there were several pugs at the show. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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The pitbull with a goofy grin. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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These Yorkshire terrier triplets were right at home in their owner's arms. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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Indian desi dogs were the highlight of the show. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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This pitbull held its solemn gaze amidst the crowds. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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Despite having a permanently injured paw from being hit by a car, Brownie still smiles and shakes hands with his owner. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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This happy beagle was quick to show off its tricks to delighted crowds. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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Owners were proud of their Indian desi dogs, especially this one who competed in the "Best Dressed" competition. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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This fluffy Chinese chow-chow demonstrated the diversity of breeds present at the show. Photo: Kelly Jobe

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Who could resist adopting this sweet Indian pup? Photo: Kelly Jobe

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These matching Dalmatians were happier to stare at each other than the camera. Photo: Kelly Jobe

CANINE AWARDS

If you're an animal lover, these photos from a dog show in Delhi will warm your heart

Kelly Jobe

It is awards season, what with the Oscars looming large and the recent YouTube cat awards.

And Delhi isn't far behind. On Republic Day, the Canis Welfare Pet Club hosted their 8th Annual Dog Show at the Punjabi Bagh Club in West Delhi. Dog owners came out to compete for prizes in many categories including "best dressed".

Also read - Delhi's dog menace: Blame the civic bodies, not the strays

The show attracted dogs of all breeds ranging - from pugs and labradors to the rare breeds such as Alaskan huskies and Chinese chow-chows.

The focus of the show, however, was the adoption of native Indian desi dogs. Desi breeds often get a raw deal when it comes to adoption and are often shunned, neglected, starved, abused and orphaned.

Dr Vijay Kumar, founder of The Canis Welfare Pet Club, hopes the event puts a spotlight on the fact that native dogs who are often neglected in favour of fancier, more exotic breeds. Kumar works tirelessly to offer free sterilisations and organises vaccination camps for dogs across Delhi.

What was even more heartening was the turnout, which proves that the attitude towards Indian desi dogs is changing and that Kumar's work is not in vain.

More in Catch - The Badmash Peepal: Saving cows with a little help from Lord Krishna

Welfare Wars: the dog-eat-dog world of animal activism no one speaks of

Forget the Academy Awards, the Oscars of Porn just happened. Lowdown here

Kelly Jobe