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This bizarre image of deformed daises was posted by Twitter user @San_kaido from Nasushiobara city, about 110 km from Fukushima.

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A 'conjoined' corn allegedly found near Fukushima published by Imgur.com.

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Tomatoes with visible tumours found near the Fukushima disaster site.

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'Mutant' flowers allegedly photographed near Fukushima.

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Conjoined flowers apparently shot by locals near Fukushima.

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A conjoined squash found close to the Fukushima disaster site.

Fukushima's deformed flowers: the damning legacy of a nuclear disaster

Priyata Brajabasi @PriyataB

When you think of the deadly Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, it's unlikely flowers spring to mind.

But these images of deformed daisies - currently doing the rounds of cyberspace - are a stark reminder of the havoc the incident is still seemingly wreaking on the environment, over four years on.

Posted on twitter by a user from Nasushiobara city, about 110 km from Fukushima, the images were accompanied by details including radiation levels in the area.

The current atmospheric dose is 0.5 uSV/h (micro seiverts per hours, a measure of radiation) at 1m above the ground. These radiation levels are typically considered safe for medium to long-term habitation.

Gardening experts aren't blanketly willing to lay the blame at nuclear radiation's door. According to reports, a few experts have held that this abnormal growth is the result fascination - a rare ailment in vascular plants caused due to hormonal imbalance.

It seems hard to accept. After the devastating tsunami and earthquake that shut down the Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima in March 2011, locals have reportedly spotted other deformed vegetables and fruit that also appeared to be affected by the high radiation levels found in the groundwater near the plant. A rabbit born without ears was also discovered in the radiation zone.

Images of bizarre deformed flora - ranging from tomatoes with tumour-like growths to monstrous cabbages and conjoined squashes - were published on the website Imgur in July 2013, suggesting that those were effects from the Fukushima radiation disaster.

With no immediate verification for the images, though, that conversation didn't make it into the public domain, until this new set of images has appeared.

It's unsurprising that Japanese officials want to shut down conversation that this is radiation damage - as evidence this is circumstantial rather than conclusive.

But in July 2013 it was confirmed that 300 tons of radioactive water was leaking from the plant into the Pacific Ocean daily. We cannot with certainty predict what that has already done or will do to human, animal and plant life in the area. What's certain is that it won't be pretty.

Priyata Brajabasi

Priyata Brajabasi @PriyataB