15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

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WORLD TRADE CENTE OCULUS

15 years post 9/11, the WTC comes back to life through its Oculus

Catch Team @catchnews

It took 12 years (designed back in 2004) and $3.9 billion to come alive. The World Trade Centre transportation hub is now officially open to the public, at least partially. Those New Yorkers and tourists alike are also getting their first look inside what is being called Oculus, the outer exterior.

The station replaces the one destoryed in the 9/11 attacks. It was originally budgeted at $2 billion. Ground wasn't broken on the new World Trade Center Transportation Hub and Shopping Center until 2010. The whole construction took a decade to be complete.

Oculus, is the exterior of the World Trade Centre transportation hub. Designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, The bird-in-flight design has translated into a public space. Whether or not that works, the public will decide over the course of the next few weeks.

The exterior of the World Trade Center transportation hub, dubbed the Oculus, has been under construction for years as costs rose from $2 billion, as planned, to $3.9 billion as construction continued. Commuters and visitors will get to decide for themselves whether Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava's bird-in-flight design has been translated into a grand public space that justifies years of delays and cost overruns.

Early reviews of the structure has been mixed - with some loving and some hating it. New York Times and Wall Street Journal were less favorable towards Port Authority's project. Vanity Fair though had much nicer things to say. The design, according to the Wall Street Journal is "meant to evoke the shape of a dove being released from a child's hands" one that "gave New Yorkers a sense of hope, and moving forward"

Here's a timelapse video from time-lapse video by the construction company giant Skanska.

Edited by Sahil Bhalla

Catch Team

Catch Team @catchnews