Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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Host Andy Samberg began the show with a funny pre-taped bit celebrating the reality of #peakTV: there's so much to watch. Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images/AFP

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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After his name was announced, after so many years of sitting and smiling and losing, Jon Hamm finally had his Emmy. It was the first time a Mad Men performer had ever won an acting Emmy, and it was Hamm's first win after 16 nominations. Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images/AFP

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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Uzo Aduba accomplished a rare feat, winning the award for best supporting actress in a drama for Orange Is the New Black, one year after she won a comedy Emmy, for guest star, for the same role. Photo: Lester Cohen/WireImage

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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The Daily Show With Jon Stewart was the big winner, taking all three of the major prizes for which it was nominated - writing for a variety series, directing for a variety series and variety talk series. "I've been off of television for six weeks," Stewart said. "This is the first applause I've heard." Photo: Lester Cohen/WireImage

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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Frances McDormandtook home Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie for her work on Olive Kitteridge. It was her first Emmy win. Photo: Lester Cohen/WireImage

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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Actor Tony Hale poses with his trophy. Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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Peter Dinklage accepts the award from actress Viola Davis for Outstanding Supporting Actor for playing Tyrion Lannister in Game of Thrones. He later admitted, "I wasn't prepared at all. In fact, I was chewing gum." Photo: Lester Cohen/WireImage

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy

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Game of Thrones' author George RR Martin happened to fall on the same day as the awards ceremony. Photo: Jef Kravitz/FilmMagic

EMMY AWARDS

Hits, misses, laughter, losses: the only Emmy's roundup you need

Aleesha Matharu @almatharu

The big night has come and gone, the Emmy's have awarded another round of actors, actresses, and series for their incredible work and performances.

And chances are you slept through it.

Because, you know, #firstworldtimings.

Well we stayed up so you dont have to, and covered it all - from actors making history, to the (inevitable) HBO dominance.

Game of Thrones became the first show to earn 12 Emmys in a single year, surpassing The West Wing, which held the record with nine.

The show picked up wins for writing (David Benioff and Dan Weiss), directing (David Nutter), best actor (Peter Dinklage), and outstanding drama series, where it bested Mad Men in a heated race.

This adds to Thrones' eight wins at the Creative Arts Emmy Awards - in categories like editing, makeup, and stunts - earlier this month.

Good night for diversity

Viola Davis's win - Best Actress in a Drama Series for How To Get Away With Murder - was a historic achievement. But in her powerful speech, Davis made sure to remind viewers - and executives - that it's still a long road.

"The only thing that separates women of colour from everyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy simply for roles that aren't there," she said, going on to thank her fellow black actresses and the people she works with who are "redefining what it means to be beautiful, sexy, to be black."

Surprisingly it wasn't such a terrible year for women of colour.

In fact, it was good night for diversity. Uzo Aduba accomplished a rare feat, winning the award for best supporting actress in a drama for Orange Is the New Black, one year after she won a comedy Emmy, for guest star, for the same role of Crazy Eyes. Her speech was emotional and she thanked supporters who 'let me be me'.

And Regina King looked utterly floored when her win was announced for her role in American Crime:

Here's Kerry Washington's reaction to Davis' win:

Memorable wins and moments

A weary Jon Hamm finally managed to cross the finish line crawling. He crawled for himself and he crawled for each of his fellow Mad Men actors who were, collectively, nominated for 35 acting awards - 34 of which went to someone else.

Modern Family was finally edged out by Veep (not Transparent as we had forecast). If it had won, the sitcom would have made history as the only series to win in that category six years in a row.

Unsurprisingly, political comedy Veep dominated this year too - winning best supporting comedy actor (Tony Hale), best comedy actress (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), best writing for a comedy series, and best comedy series, breaking Modern Family's five-year winning streak.

Once again, Amy Poehler didn't win Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series - but she certainly won the category in another way:

Transparent took home two awards early in the night, with Jill Soloway and Jeffrey Tambor both giving touching speeches about trans rights.

Soloway, in a polka dot suit with shoulder pads, remarked: "We don't have a trans tipping point, we have a trans civil rights problem" before directing viewers to a website to help do something about it.

The variety-sketch award went to Inside Amy Schumer, which in its third season is redefining confessional, first-person comedy and carrying the standard for a new wave of women comedy writers and performers.

Six-part mini series Olive Kitteridge turned out to be one of the biggest winners of the night. Based on a novel by Elizabeth Strout, it was another ace in the hole for HBO, winning the Limited Series category award, both lead acting honours (Frances McDormand and Richard Jenkins), as well as awards for writing and directing.

NBC's The Voice has finally helped make the historically lopsided reality competition category a race, creating a rivalry with long-dominant The Amazing Race. The two have now alternated as winners the last four years. And The Voice, with its 2 Emmys, is now the only show with multiple wins besides Race, which has a staggering 10.

In the closing moments of the night, Tracy Morgan came out on stage to present the award for best drama. It was his first time in front of an audience since he suffered a traumatic brain injury in a serious car accident.

Morgan got an epic-length ovation while his 30 Rock co-stars Tina Fey and Jane Krakowski started tearing up in the audience. He looked emotional as he thanked his doctors and family and then ended with a classic Tracy Morgan joke: "Only recently I've started to feel like myself again, which means a whole lot of y'all women gonna get pregnant at the after-party."

For some reason, the producers decided to chuck in a video sequence that was soul crushing for some viewers as it depicted a section of spoilers from a whole host of shows.

Those yet to finish watching their series of choice were left with their mouths open as sequence after sequence revealed final moments - ruining each show that ended this year one by one. Especially Sons of Anarchy.

Andy Samberg addressed the situation by saying: Welcome back to the spoiler awards. I guess everyone on every show died.

More or less, Samberg wasn't a terrible host. The Lonely Island singer did eschew the big sketches that usually tended to make past Emmy ceremonies ridiculously long. The jokes didn't even cross any lines. Not even the Donald Trump ones.

The show began with a funny pre-taped bit celebrating the reality of #peakTV: there's so much to watch (including 40-plus shows about wives), the only way to do it is to hole up in a bunker for a year, and even then you might forget to watch all of Castle.

As he hosted, Samberg noted that many of the nominees this year come from HBO - and that many people still might not have a subscription to HBO Now.

But since HBO CEO Richard Plepler recently said that he doesn't care if you share passwords with your friends, Samberg, of course, ever a man of the people, went ahead and did us all a kindness and shared his own login credentials: Username, khaleesifan3@emmyhost.com and password, shockingly, password1.

Also, in case you were wondering about the one accessory that got a tonne of screen time - a green ribbon - worn by many of the cast and crew behind Transparent and Veep, several other nominees and winners, the answer was right on the ribbon: #DemandClimateAction.

It's a campaign put forward by the National Resources Defense Council and a petition will be delivered at a major summit in Paris this December.

On a last light note, here's Kate Mckinnon's reaction to her nomination being announced:

Aleesha Matharu

Aleesha Matharu @almatharu